New prenatal tests provide more information, but link to problems isn’t clear

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Midway through her pregnancy four years ago, Denise Bratina got some scary news. Doctors told Bratina, then 37, that amniocentesis results showed that her unborn child was missing a small segment of DNA from chromosome 15. The missing DNA, they said, might cause a long list of problems, including seizures, heart defects and developmental delays. Or it might cause no problems at all.

Five months later, Bratina’s daughter Ella was born healthy.

Some experts worry that microarray testing might provide too much information, since it can reveal genetic abnormalities that may not cause a problem or that have not been linked to known problems or disorders.

Read the full, original story here: New prenatal tests provide more information, but link to problems isn’t clear

Outbreak Featured
Infographic: Growing human embryos — How long should researchers watch human development play out in a dish?

Infographic: Growing human embryos — How long should researchers watch human development play out in a dish?

In May, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) released new guidelines that relaxed the 14-day rule, taking away ...
Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

First introduced in 1995, neonicotinoids ...
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
glp menu logo outlined

Get news on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.