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Concerns raised over ‘Franken-carnations’

| | December 16, 2013

The UK’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has raised concerns over the use of ornamental carnations in food as a garnish, because some varieties are genetically modified.

The concerns emerged after Suntory Holdings Ltd–a food and beverage company–applied for a license to import carnations that had been genetically modified to have violet petals and higher tolerance to herbicide. The Advisory Committee on Releases to the Environment says that the carnations do “not pose an increased risk to human health” compared with their non-GM counterpart.

However, because they are not intended for human consumption, a Defra spokesperson has warned against eating the petals when they are used as a garnish.

Professor Huw Jones, Research Group Leader at the Centre for Crop Genetic Improvement, Plant Biology and Crop Science at Rothamsted Research says the genetic changes are unlikely to be harmful.

Read the full, original story: Franken-carnations on sale in Britain – just don’t eat them

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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