DNA of basketball: Generation after generation of NBA All-Stars

For a growing number of fathers and sons, the N.B.A. is a family business. This season, 19 second-generation players have appeared in games — a total that represents 4.2 percent of the league, and is nearly twice as many players as a decade ago.

Players and coaches cite several factors in the rise of second-generation players, who tend to benefit from genetics (it helps to be tall) and from early access to top-notch instruction. Steve Kerr, a former guard and front-office executive, likened the setting to being immersed in a “basketball think tank” from childhood.

“When you grow up in that world, you’re exposed to the best teaching and the best coaching,” said Kerr, an analyst for Turner Sports.

Read the full, original story: A Generational Wealth of N.B.A. Talent

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