Genetic manipulation is a slippery–so get over it

This week, the Food and Drug Administration debated a new IVF technique that could allow women with mitochondrial disease to have children who are genetically their own without the risk of passing along the condition. The proposed treatment involves yanking out the nucleus of a donor egg and popping in a nucleus from the mom-to-be.

Last winter, I attended a panel on the ethics of germline manipulation where participants debated a resolution to prohibit genetically engineered babies.  Lee Silver (Princeton) and Nina Farahany (Duke Law) represented the anti position (i.e., let’s NOT prohibit genetically engineered babies) and won the debate by focusing on – wait for it — nuclear transfer for mitochondrial disease!  Forbid genetic engineering, they argued, and you rule out this potentially game-changing therapy for afflicted families hoping to give their kids a life free from the burden of life-long, incurable disease.  In other words, another slippery slope argument, only the other way round – accept the concept of regulation in any form, let the bureaucrats in, and you cut yourself off from progress and doom families forever to suffering that could have been prevented.

Slippery slope arguments are a plea to make things stand still for a moment, so a person can get their bearings.  Anyone who works in genetics can relate to that sentiment.  But history is itself a slippery slope from a turbulent past to an uncertain future, and we don’t have the luxury of stepping off.  So what should we do about nuclear transfer for mitochondrial disease?  Well, let’s make a decision based on mitochondrial disease and the very sensitive nature of the human embryo, which may not take kindly to this manipulation.  Let’s not make it the last word on anything.

Read full original article: It’s a Slippery Slope. Get Over it.

ADVERTISEMENT
Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
GLP Podcasts
Infographic: Here’s where GM crops are grown around the world today

Infographic: Here’s where GM crops are grown around the world today

Do you know where biotech crops are grown in the world? This updated ISAAA infographics show where biotech crops were ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
Send this to a friend