GMO cereals have less vitamins, but maybe that’s not a bad thing

t is a fact that the new formulations do have fewer vitamins than those containing GMO ingredients. Industry site BakeryandSnacks.com says the new GMO-free Cheerios are missing vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin B12, and vitamin B2 (riboflavin), while non-GMO Grape-Nuts are virtually devoid of riboflavin, with the vitamin falling from 25% of the daily value to 2%. But General Mills points out it never said going GMO-free was necessarily “more wholesome.” And according to BakeryandSnacks.com, neither General Mills nor Post would comment on “whether it has anything to do with the costs or challenges of going through the non-GMO Project verification process for the vitamins in question.”

As for your bowl of cereal being like a multivitamin, it’s essentially an overblown issue. Yes, cereal makers add vitamins to their cereals before bagging them — that’s why they’re called “fortified” cereals — but you’re likely getting all that you need from a regular healthy diet anyway. All those B vitamins the GM-based cereals give you are also found in oatmeal, lean meats, chicken, fish, dried beans, nuts, leafy greens, and bananas. Vitamin A can be found in red and orange fruits and vegetables like carrots and tomatoes, leafy greens, and broccoli. Vitamin C is found in citrus fruits, strawberries, red bell peppers, broccoli, potatoes, and cantaloupe. To think you need to eat a bowl of genetically modified Cheerios to get a big jump on your vitamin needs is a distraction at best.

Related article:  Orthorexia nervosa: Do anti-GMO activists have this 'eating disorder'?

Read the full original article: GMO-Free Cereal Has a Vitamin Deficiency, Which Isn’t So Bad

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