Stem cell trial for stroke shows potential for lasting benefits

| | May 12, 2014
This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

People who received the world’s first stem cell treatment for strokes have shown measurable reductions in disability and handicap a year after the injection into their damaged brains.

Some can move limbs and manage everyday tasks that were impossible before they received an injection of neural progenitor stem cells, which were clones of cells originally taken from the cortex of a donated fetus.

Apart from physical rehabilitation, there are few treatments for people left severely disabled by a stroke. Demand for more options is high, with 800,000 new cases each year in the US and 150,000 in the UK.

“We’re encouraged, and it’s a nice progressive piece of news,” says Michael Hunt, the chief executive officer of ReNeuron, the company in Guildford, UK, that developed the treatment. “We must be circumspect, but we are seeing what seems to be a general trend towards improvement in a disparate group of patients,” he says.

Read the full, original story: First stem cell trial for stroke shows lasting benefits

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