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Review of neonicotinoids’ effects on human health finds few studies, ‘methodologically weak findings’

honey bee
This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

Prior to 2000, neonicotinoid chemicals were virtually unknown, by farmers or anyone else. They have since become the most widely used class of agricultural insecticides on the planet. With their rise has come evidence they are contributing to devastating losses of honeybees, yet despite widespread human exposure through fruits and vegetables, however, little research has been conducted on potential effects on human health, according to a review in [Environmental Health Perspectives].

[Senior author Melissa] Perry and colleagues initiated their review by searching the peer-reviewed literature for epidemiological studies published between 2005 and 2015 that addressed human health effects of neonicotinoids. What they found was surprising, Perry says: A total of just eight studies met their parameters. Half of those addressed acute exposures, including accidental or intentional self-poisoning, and half addressed chronic environmental exposures.

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[Editor’s note: Read the full study]

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Catching Up with Popular Pesticides: More Human Health Studies Are Needed on Neonicotinoids

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