Aquabounty and food activists clash over need for labels for GMO salmon

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Four-and-a-half tons of genetically modified salmon have been released into the Canadian food market, and consumers have no way of knowing exactly where.

The release has roiled GM food skeptics, who say there’s no way for them to figure out whether the fish—sold by Massachusetts-based AquaBounty Technologies—were purchased by Canadian retailers, restaurants, or food service operators. Even more frustrating to them, the Canadian government does not require GM foods be labeled as such, making them virtually impossible to avoid.

What’s happening in Canada with the rollout of the salmon—the first country in which it will be sold—is noteworthy because, in the last decade, a negative narrative, fair or unfair, has developed around genetically modified foods, driven by a relatively small but vocal contingent of skeptics who want to avoid eating those foods. Until now their ire has been aimed at GM corn, soybeans, and other plant products. But AquaBounty is introducing the first genetically-modified food animal to its first market, a powerful moment for future foods.

Quartz reached out to AquaBounty to learn more about the salmon rollout and its future plans. The company did not make someone available to discuss those topics.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: The rollout of the first genetically modified food animal is being bungled