Regulatory, ethical issues muddy the waters around advanced reproductive technologies

| | March 2, 2018

In November 2017, a baby named Emma Gibson was born in the state of Tennessee. Her birth, to a 25-year-old woman, was fairly typical, but one aspect made her story unique: she was conceived 24 years prior from anonymous donors, when Emma’s mother was just a year old. The embryo had been frozen for more than two decades before it was implanted into her mother’s uterus and grew into the baby who would be named Emma.

The organization that provided baby Emma’s embryo to her parents, the National Embryo Donation Center (NEDC), has policies that state they will only provide embryos to married, heterosexual couples, in addition to several health requirements. Single women and non-heterosexual couples are not eligible.

The future of reproductive technology has many excited about its potential to allow biological birth for those who might not otherwise have been capable of it…

Yet, who will have access to these advances? Current trends seem to suggest that this will depend on the actions of regulators and insurance agencies, rather than the people who are affected the most.

“Reproductive medicine has existed in this country in an almost wholly unregulated state,” Megan Allyse, a bioethicist with the Mayo Clinic specializing in reproductive and genetic ethics, told Futurism…“And so efforts to regulate it run into this very complicated nexus.”

Read full, original post: Advanced Reproductive Technology is Here. But Who Decides Who Gets Access?

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.

 

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