Antidepressant matchmaker? Genetic test could help identify correct drugs faster

| | May 9, 2018
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Image source: Medscape
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Depression is a complicated condition, and so are the people it affects. It’s often difficult — and can take months or even years — to find the right drugs to treat the heterogeneous mood disorder.

Since 2010, however, there has been a genetic test that can help doctors learn how a person’s genetic makeup can also affect their response to various antidepressants.

In a new study presented at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting, researchers say that people using the test, called GeneSight, are 50% more likely to achieve remission after eight weeks, and 30% more likely to the respond to the drugs the test recommended, compared to people treated without the test. (The study has not been published in a peer-reviewed journal.)

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GeneSight, from Myriad Genetics, looks at 12 genes involved in how people break down 56 different antidepressant drugs…

But the tests are not completely accurate, and some psychiatrists warn that most studies of such gene-based testing for antidepressant prescribing to date have involved only a small group of people who have been followed for a short period of time…

The test is not necessarily designed to guide doctors to the ‘right’ drugs for treating an individual person’s depression; it’s more useful in helping them navigate away from the drugs that might cause people to experience bad side effects.

Read full, original post: A Genetic Test Could Help Predict the Right Antidepressant For You

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