Three’s company? BrainNet successfully connects trio’s brains and thoughts

1-23-2019 brainnet featured brain eeg brain signal
Image credit: Sarmad Sameer

Neuroscientists have successfully hooked up a three-way brain connection to allow three people to share their thoughts – and in this case, play a Tetris-style game.

The team thinks this wild experiment could be scaled up to connect whole networks of people, and yes, it’s as weird as it sounds.

It works through a combination of electroencephalograms (EEGs), for recording the electrical impulses that indicate brain activity, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), where neurons are stimulated using magnetic fields.

The researchers behind the system have dubbed it BrainNet, and say it could eventually be used to connect many different minds together, even across the web.

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In the experiment set up by the scientists, two ‘senders’ were connected to EEG electrodes and asked to play a Tetris-style game involving falling blocks. They had to decide whether each block needed rotating or not.

Related article:  Why this woman played the violin during her brain surgery

These choices were then relayed to a single ‘receiver’ through a TMS cap that could generate phantom flashes of light in the receiver’s mind, known as phosphenes.

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The receiver couldn’t see the whole game area, but had to rotate the falling block if a light flash signal was sent.

Across five different groups of three people, the researchers hit an average accuracy level of 81.25 percent, which is decent for a first try.

Read full, original post: Brains of 3 People Have Been Successfully Connected, Enabling Them to Share Thoughts

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