‘The technology is already here’: Implants could eliminate regular health checkups

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Credit: Tech Announcer

Imagine it’s the year 2040 and you’re due for your regular health checkup. Time to schedule your next colonoscopy, Pap smear if you’re a woman, and prostate screen if you’re a man.

But wait, you no longer need any of those, since you recently got one of the new biomed implants – a device that integrates seamlessly with body tissues, because of a watershed breakthrough that happened in the early 2020s. It’s an improved biological transistor driven by electrically charged particles that move in and out of your own cells. Like insulin pumps and cardiac pacemakers, the medical implants of the future will go where they are needed, on or inside the body.

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But unlike current implants, biological transistors will have a remarkable range of applications. Currently small enough to fit between a patient’s hair follicles, the devices could one day enable correction of problems ranging from damaged heart muscle to failing retinas to deficiencies of hormones and enzymes.

The technology is already here, and it’s just a matter of time before we see clinically viable, implantable devices. As for how society will react, it seems safe to say that some lively debates and growing pains are on the horizon.

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