Children who finish puberty earlier — usually girls — tend to do better in school

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Credit: Youth Connections Coalition
Credit: Youth Connections Coalition

Girls do better than boys in almost all subjects at school. Many researchers are concerned about the growing differences in girls’ and boys’ grades. Why this is the case, however, they haven’t been able to find a good answer to. Brain researchers who have studied girls’ and boys’ brains haven’t been able to explain the discrepancy. Boys and girls are equally smart.

But now researchers at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health have made an exciting discovery in a new study. They found that pupils who reach puberty early simply perform better at school than those who reach puberty late. This finding applies to both boys and girls. In other words, it’s not whether you are a girl or a boy that matters, but rather how early or late you reach puberty.

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Researchers don’t believe that puberty in and of itself is the deciding factor on whether you do well in school. They believe it’s more likely that puberty is related to psychological factors. We simply become more mature when we reach puberty.

This is an excerpt. Read the original post here.

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