Doctors should tell patients about some — not all — unexpected genetic findings

The following is an excerpt.

On Thursday [21 March 2013], the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics recommended that doctors tell patients about certain genetic disease risks if they accidentally find them when exploring a patient’s genome for another reason. However, the group does not recommend that doctors tell patients about all incidental findings.

The issue concerns many medical geneticists and other clinicians who use genome data in their practice. When a patient gets genetic testing to hunt for an explanation for heart trouble, should a doctor tell that patient if he or she sees a predisposition for breast cancer or early onset Alzheimer’s disease?

View the original article here: Doctors Should Tell Patients About Some, But Not All, Unexpected Genetic Findings

Outbreak
Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
Genetics Unzipped
Infographic: How dangerous COVID mutant strains develop

Infographic: How dangerous COVID mutant strains develop

Sometime in 2019, probably in China, SARS CoV-2 figured out a way to interact with a specific "spike" on the ...
Untitled

Philip Njemanze: Leading African anti-GMO activist claims Gates Foundation destroying Nigeria

Nigerian anti-GMO activist, physician, and inventor pushes anti-gay and anti-GMO ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

Optional. Mail on special occasions.
Send this to a friend