Where does cloning stand 20 years after Dolly the sheep?

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis.

Why are there no human clones?

Because of scientific, ethical, and commercial reasons.

. . . .[The] technique, called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), turned out not to be so easy in other species.

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. . . .

There has also been no commercial motive for human cloning. Both the assisted reproduction (IVF) and pharmaceutical industries “immediately said they had no interest in human cloning,” said bioethicist George Annas. . . “. . . All new technologies are driven by the profit motive,” absent which they tend to languish.

. . . .

But surely someone has made money from Dolly-like cloning work?

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Livestock cloning has become a commercial business, with ViaGen — part of biotech company Intrexon — cloning cattle, sheep, and pigs. It also clones pets. But it’s not a huge business.

. . . .

 

Where are those medical breakthroughs?

They were premised on what’s called therapeutic cloning, to distinguish it from reproductive cloning.

. . . .

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. . . [H]umans are really tough [to clone]. It wasn’t until 2014 that scientists, led by Dieter Egli. . ., used a variation on the Dolly recipe to create the first disease-specific cell lines from a patient, with type 1 diabetes.

Read full, original post: It’s been 20 years since Dolly. Where’s my clone?

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