Afraid of burnt toast? Food expert says it’s dangerous to fear modern food

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Many foods contain acrylamide, so the chemical can’t be avoided, [Joe] Schwarcz [of the Office for Science and Society at McGill University in Montreal] said.

“Coffee contains levels close to French fries and potato chips, and given the amounts consumed, represents a far greater intake. Yet, coffee has not been associated with cancer. ”

Some experts say consumers should direct their efforts on addressing well-established hazards and patterns, such as smoking, drinking and obesity.

“Evidence from animal studies shows that acrylamide has the potential to interact with the DNA in our cells, so could be linked to cancer,” the charity Cancer Research UK said in a response to the British food agency’s announcement.

“However, evidence from human studies has shown that, for most cancer types, there is no link between acrylamide and cancer risk.”

“I think maybe one of the greatest food dangers is to be scared about our food,” [Schwarcz’s colleague, Prof. Ariel] Fenster said in an interview….

“Something might be toxic but it depends on the amount. For instance, in the case of toasted bread, it is true maybe if you eat a lot of bread that is highly toasted it could be a risk but for most people the risk is really minimal.”

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: ‘One of the greatest food dangers is to be scared about our food,’ chemist says

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