A pill for breast cancer? There’s one for early-stage patients with aggressive cases — and it works

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Credit: ViewStock
Credit: ViewStock

A drug sold by AstraZeneca and Merck & Co. reduced the recurrence of breast cancer in women with an early but aggressive form of the disease, a long-running international study found.

The finding, which on [June 3] was published online by the New England Journal of Medicine and released at a major cancer-research meeting, marked the latest advance in cancer treatments targeting the genetic traits of tumors. It could expand the arsenal of weapons against a hereditary form of breast cancer.

The result also helps validate the pharmaceutical industry’s investment in a pricey new class of drugs that target cancer cells, known as PARP inhibitors.

Follow the latest news and policy debates on agricultural biotech and biomedicine? Subscribe to our newsletter.

PARP inhibitors work by blocking cancer cells from relying on a survival tactic: the ability to repair their own DNA after their DNA is damaged naturally or by other drug treatments. This, in turn, contributes to cancer-cell death.

Health regulators have approved these types of drugs in recent years to treat ovarian, breast, prostate and pancreatic cancers.

The drugs have been found to be particularly useful against cancers associated with harmful mutations in genes known as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Women with these hereditary mutations have a higher risk of developing breast cancer, and often at a younger age than is typical.

Read the original post

Related article:  Staving off dementia through lifestyle changes, including exercise, weight loss
Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
GLP Podcasts
Infographic: Trending green and going great — Every state in the US seeing decreased cases of COVID

Infographic: Trending green and going great — Every state in the US seeing decreased cases of COVID

The U.S. averaged fewer than 40,000 new cases per day over the past week. That’s a 21% improvement over the ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists