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Articles written for the GLP list the source as Genetic Literacy Project. All other articles were written for the sources noted with excerpts provided by the GLP.
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Warm weather won’t solve COVID-19 pandemic by itself

Katherine Wu | 
Many infectious diseases wax and wane with the changing months. Some, like flu, spike when the weather turns cold, while others, ...
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How a few pioneering botanists prepared us to battle the coronavirus outbreak

Theresa Machemer | 
When German pathologist Robert Koch discovered the bacterium behind tuberculosis in 1882, he included a short guide for linking microorganisms ...
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Chance of extraterrestrial contact will multiply by 1,000 in coming decade, says SETI scientist

Tom Siegfried | 
[H]owever small the probability of seeing a signal from E.T. is, those chances are soon going to be a lot ...
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1918 Spanish flu redux? ‘Unprepared for the deluge of death’, politicians rejected ‘social distancing’ in bungled handling of the pandemic

Kenneth Davis | 
It was a parade like none Philadelphia had ever seen.... When the Fourth Liberty Loan Drive parade stepped off on September ...
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Trends that will shape the 2020s: Psychedelics as medicine, diagnostic cell phone apps and AI prediction of disease outbreaks

Katherine Wu, Rachael Lallensack | 
Clearly, a lot can happen in a decade—but innovation has to start somewhere. Based on what’s breaking through now, here ...
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Before Gwyneth Paltrow and Goop: 19th century’s Madame Yale and her ‘Religion of Beauty’

Emmeline Clein | 
On an April afternoon in 1897, thousands of women packed the Boston Theatre to see the nation’s most beguiling female entrepreneur, ...
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Exploring the uneasy relationship between Charles Darwin and his skeptical publisher

Dan Falk | 
Charles Darwin’s ideas about evolution shook up Britain’s Victorian establishment upon the release of On the Origin of Species, the 1859 ...
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‘Simple blood test’ could give us an early warning system for cancer

Sarah Richards | 
As of 2020, there are now targeted therapy drugs for 30 kinds of cancer. As part of this whirlwind of innovation, ...
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Palm trees grown from 2,000-year-old date seeds reinforce existence of ancient Judea’s ‘sophisticated’ crop domestication culture

Brigit Katz | 
In ancient times, the region of Judea was known for its plump, delicious dates, which delighted the palates of classical ...
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This year’s flu season may be just as bad as last year’s—and we still don’t have a universal vaccine

Andrea Michelson | 
With the deadly 2017-2018 flu season still fresh in public health officials’ minds, this year’s outbreak is shaping up to be ...
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‘Living, self-healing xenobots’ made from frog stem cells could lead to new drug delivery system

Katherine Wu | 
They’re perfect strangers: biological entities that, up until this point, had no business being together. And yet, [microbiologist Michael] Levin ...
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‘Chilling’ solution to Fermi paradox: Are intelligent life forms destined to destroy themselves?

James Trefil, Michael Summers | 
If we compress the history of the universe into a single year, Earth and our solar system formed around Labor ...
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Genetic analysis reshapes our understanding of when humans first arrived in North America

Fen Montaigne | 
For more than half a century, the prevailing story of how the first humans came to the Americas went like ...
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How whales got so big eating tiny krill. And why they don’t get bigger

Katherine Wu | 
Pound for pound, the blue whale’s reign is indisputable. At around 100 feet long and 100 tons in size, these ...
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Pea-sized mini brains just developed brain waves for the first time

Thiago Arzua | 
Mini-brains are just the size of a pea but capable of reproducing key brain functions. They are currently a hot research topic because scientists think they ...
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Our ancestors may have evolved the ability to talk 27 million years earlier than we thought

Brian Handwerk | 
Some scientists have theorized that it only became physically possible to speak a wide range of essential vowel sounds when ...
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Gene therapy may offer cure for debilitating ‘bubble boy disease’

Jessica Ravitz | 
Omarion was born with a rare genetic disorder called X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), better known as the “bubble boy ...
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Bioengineering’s ‘holy grail’: Scientists closer to creating printable skin to cover burns, other injuries

Emily Matchar | 
Creating a durable, natural-looking skin substitute to cover burn injuries or other wounds has been a bioengineer’s holy grail for decades ...
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Why the public’s limited understanding of science makes horror movies so terrifying

Jeanne Dorin McDowell | 
In a memorable scene from the 1931 horror classic Frankenstein, Dr. Frankenstein stands over his sentient monster, a beast he created from ...
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World War I gave us our first personality test—to assess soldiers for risk of shell shock

Lila Thulin | 
Shell shock ultimately sent 15 percent of British soldiers home. Their symptoms included uncontrollable weeping, amnesia, tics, paralysis, nightmares, insomnia, heart ...
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Can we treat Alzheimer’s by ‘seeding our guts’ with beneficial bateria?

Jenna Sternberg | 
In a study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine earlier this year, microbiologist Hemraj Dodiya of the University of Chicago and ...
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‘Permanent fix’ for melanoma, blindness, sickle cell? CRISPR gene editing tackles diseases

Lila Thulin | 
In the past 12 months, four clinical trials launched in the United States to use CRISPR to treat and potentially cure patients ...
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3.8-million-year-old Australopithecus anamensis skull found in Ethiopia may redefine branches of human evolution

Brian Handwerk | 
Spotting the intact Australopithecus skull in the Ethiopian dirt caused paleoanthropologist Yohannes Haile-Selassie to literally jump for joy. … The ...
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Why the USDA employed taste testers to change how Americans eat

Michael Waters | 
Lucy Alexander boasted one of the strangest jobs on the federal payroll. Her official title was the innocuous “chief poultry ...
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Much more than an ‘itchy pest’: Mosquitoes have played a major role in human history

Emily Toomey, Timothy Winegard | 
Fifty-two billion people—almost half of the cumulative human population—are thought to have perished at the hands of a creature no ...
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Activist group Friends of the Earth study reports farms 48 times more toxic than 25 years ago, blames neonicotinoids

Meilan Solly | 
[T]he United States’ agricultural landscape is 48 times more toxic to insects than it was 25 years ago. Per a ...
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How fragile egg shells could help us repair, grow new bones

Emily Matchar | 
We think of eggshells as fragile. Yet these thin, easily breakable shells may be the key to making better, stronger ...
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Biblical Philistines came from southern Europe, suggests analysis of ancient DNA

Megan Gannon | 
“[P]hilistine” is still sometimes lobbed as an insult for an uncultured or crass person. But who were the Philistines, exactly? ...