CRISPR opens door to new generation of more nutritious and delicious fruits and vegetables

| | September 21, 2016
Fruits and Vegetables
This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

A few weeks ago, Stefan Jansson, a Swedish plant biologist, sat down to a plate of pasta with cabbage harvested from his garden. This [cabbage’s]… DNA had been edited via a… gene-editing technique called CRISPR…

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What might be confusing though is that Jansson’s cabbage, Brassica oleracea, did not look like or taste like cabbage—and it …[didn’t] even before scientists took CRISPR to its DNA …The exact variety Jansson grew is not farmed…

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With CRISPR, scientists can now genetically engineer foods with much more ease… CRISPR could make… fruits and vegetables more nutritious and delicious…

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After the first meal… Jansson sat down to a second plate of pasta and cabbage… This time, he used a little more cabbage… He was… hesitant because wild cabbage contains loads of glucosinolates, molecules that give [the vegetables] their pungency but… Too much of it can make humans sick, and his cabbage was… not originally bred for cultivation.

His stomach didn’t feel great after, Jansson confessed… But CRISPR, he suggested, could help with that. Scientists could use the technique to hunt down glucosinolate genes… deleting the ones that upset stomachs…

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: CRISPR Could Usher In a New Era of Delicious GMO Foods

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