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‘Live life to the fullest’: Should autism research shift away from the search for a cure and focus on wellness?

| | October 3, 2019

“There’s no cure for autism and anybody who tries to sell you a cure is lying,” [Lizzie] Acevedo, a single parent and a fifth grade teacher in Los Angeles, said.

But she understands why parents of autistic children can fall prey to scams. “I’ve been where they are now, and I know how desperate it feels to want to get your child to be better,” she said.

When autism research started to really accelerate a couple decades ago, many scientists thought finding a cure might be easier. Today, the latest science points away from a single cure, but there are ways to help autistic people lead healthier, happier lives and more that can be done to help.

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Like Acevedo’s boys, a growing number of teens and adults are living on the autism spectrum, but Bascom and others say there is far too little research on understanding how autistic people are affected across their lifespan and how to help them live life to the fullest.

“I would love to see some more money put into the transition of young adults with autism into the most independent living situation they can get,” Acevedo said.

Read full, original post: Why the focus of autism research is shifting away from searching for a ‘cure’

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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