Consumers may pay more for lab-grown meat once told about its perceived benefits

| | April 24, 2020
lab meat
Crredit: Reason Magazine
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A study at Maastricht University claims people are prepared to pay more for lab-grown meat after being told of its perceived benefits.

To gain a better understanding of the drivers behind consumer acceptance and the sensory perception of in vitro meat, researchers at the university asked 193 participants from the Netherlands to taste real meat, so they didn’t know about the possibility of being offered cultured meat beforehand.

Each group [of study participants] received a different type of info: Group 1: Societal Benefits (environment, animal welfare). Group 2: Personal benefits (process, info on nutrition and safety). Group 3: Meat quality & taste (nothing on the specific benefits of cultured meat).

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The subjects then completed a questionnaire and were offered two pieces of hamburger, one labelled ‘conventional’ and the other labelled ‘cultured’. In reality, however, both were regular burgers.

58% of the respondents said they would be prepared to pay a premium for cultured meat at an average of 37% on top of the price of ordinary meat.

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